Turfgrass

St augustine in help

St augustine in help

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gonecrazy – posted 10 July 2001 15:30

Does anyone now what is the rate to applying Asulox on a pretty damaged, full of weed st.augustine grass. I think I have all the species available of weeds in my yard!

Any sugestions.

Thank You

wdrake – posted 10 July 2001 19:59

Literature I am reading says Asulox is for commerical applicators, not homeowners. Recommended rate on St Augustine is 5 pints in 20 to 50 gallons of water per acre. Details at: www.us.cropscience.aventis.com/crop/images/labels/asulox.pdf

william – posted 16 October 2003 11:58

quote:Originally posted by gonecrazy:Does anyone now what is the rate to applying Asulox on a pretty damaged, full of weed st.augustine grass. I think I have all the species available of weeds in my yard! Any sugestions.

Thank You

can you tell me where to get asulox. crabgrass is killing my st augustine grass. thank you . e mail trackingguy@aol.com

Jims’ Turf – posted 17 October 2003 16:09

ASULOX is no longer labeled for residential use. Another one of those great products stripped from the hands of professionals because of the miss-application and most often over application by homeowners getting there hands on it. Read the label, it will tell you exactly what to do. If you can’t figure it out by the label then you shouldn’t be using it. Sorry. Yes, a sore subject for me. I hope you figure it out without killing your lawn or more importantly hurting the enviroment.

RMahanJr – posted 27 July 2004 13:19

Since losing Asulox, the best way to repair your St. Augustine lawn is to kill all the crabgrass with Roundup (or similar herbicide), then replant with grass plugs. The herbicide will also kill the intermingled St. Augustine, but replanting with grass plugs will solve that.

The plugs are available in all St. Augustine varieties (Floratam, Delmar, Palmetto, Raleigh, etc.), so select the type that you have (likely Floratam). They’re available at Home Depot and other garden centers; there are pamphlets there with directions, but it’s not hard. The pluggin tool makes it easier (& faster).

RickR – posted 18 October 2005 13:52

I have to disagree with RMahanJr’s response. 1)Crabgrass does not have rhizomes and therefore doesn’t need to be killed first inorder to prevent the plant from growing back from underground plant parts. 2)If you kill the crabgrass with Roundup and plug you will most likely have trouble keeping crabgrass from smothering the plugs that will germinate from viable seed that will be in the dead crabgrass areas. 3) You will remove a lot of seed by removing the crabgrass live and resodding. While this takes more effort and expense than plugging, you have a better chance of getting rid of the crabgrass with resodding.

Guest – posted 26 November 2005 10:20

I have had good luck using common backing soda. At first I sprinkled the soda on the affected areas which worked, but found that mixing it with water (about 1 cup/gal) was easier to apply. The area will turn brown but it is the crabgrass and not the good stuff!

joe dokes – posted 27 November 2005 18:24

1/2 oz per gal will do it

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