Turfgrass

bermuda sod lubbock

bermuda sod lubbock

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

west tx grass – posted 09 April 2008 15:50

ok need some advice. just purchased my first home. large yard. the builder had a sprinkler system installed and bermuda sod. my problem is, front, sides, and rear of yard are terribly rough. deep pits where they trenched for the sprinklers, mounds in other places. it looks like they leveled the lawn with tnt. literally. also they didnt roll one side and we have horrible holes where the trenches go. any advice on how to fix this. i have a shovel, truck and strong back to fix the holes. im wondering if i should fill over the grass and let grass grow thru the new soil, or lift the sod and fill under it to level? some places it has taken root, some, not at all.thanks for any advice.

Quentyn – posted 14 April 2008 20:49

If it’s absolutely horrible all over, your best bet is to pull up the sod in sections (if it hasn’t rooted firmly yet) and level out the plot section by section. Replace the sod and water it in.

If the sod is fairly new, and it’s just spots here and there, the fix could be fairly easy. But, it will also be labor intensive and the result will be temporarily ugly. Wherever you have the holes or trenches, cut the sod off the top of or away from the affected areas. A utility knife works fine for this. Fill in with a soil, compost, mulch mixture. Tamp it down, lightly water it and replace the sod. Be sure to butt the sod you cut away tightly against the original seam you cut.

Do the same for the humps. Cut around the base of the high spots, move the sod, level the soil, replace the sod. (Might do this first and use the removed soil to fill the holes/trenches).

Grab a couple rolls of sod and cut to fit any missing spots. Fill any gaps with the soil mixture and tend to the sod as you would normally. Don’t worry about those gaps, just make sure you pack them firmly with soil. It will give the grass something to spread into and prevent the seams from drying out. In about 60 days, the turf will knit itself all back together.

One last thing you might do is rent a roller and lightly roll the remaining high spots. Outside of that, normal watering will also help to level things out a bit.

I had a similar experience in my front yard. A neighbor came by the other day and said the grass looks like it’s been there for years … it’s been there more like 90 days or so.

west tx grass – posted 15 April 2008 16:43

unfortunately it has taken root almost everywhere. fortunately we put in a flowerbed in front and were able to take care of quite a bit of the uglyness that was left. there are some low places in very front corner by the street but its rooted well there. think im going to slowly fill in with topsoil and sand mixture. as for the trench holes the sand and topsoil will be about my only option, they are at least 3 to 6 in deep in places. so im guessing slowly i’ll fill those in like the corner hole. i think its going to be a long slow process to have my yard the way i want it, slowly filling in holes to let the grass grow thru. what is your opinion on leveling with sand using a piece of chain link fence? i’ve talk to people that have done it and they said it works great to level out low spots? thanks

quote:Originally posted by Quentyn:If it’s absolutely horrible all over, your best bet is to pull up the sod in sections (if it hasn’t rooted firmly yet) and level out the plot section by section. Replace the sod and water it in.

If the sod is fairly new, and it’s just spots here and there, the fix could be fairly easy. But, it will also be labor intensive and the result will be temporarily ugly. Wherever you have the holes or trenches, cut the sod off the top of or away from the affected areas. A utility knife works fine for this. Fill in with a soil, compost, mulch mixture. Tamp it down, lightly water it and replace the sod. Be sure to butt the sod you cut away tightly against the original seam you cut.

Do the same for the humps. Cut around the base of the high spots, move the sod, level the soil, replace the sod. (Might do this first and use the removed soil to fill the holes/trenches).

Grab a couple rolls of sod and cut to fit any missing spots. Fill any gaps with the soil mixture and tend to the sod as you would normally. Don’t worry about those gaps, just make sure you pack them firmly with soil. It will give the grass something to spread into and prevent the seams from drying out. In about 60 days, the turf will knit itself all back together.

One last thing you might do is rent a roller and lightly roll the remaining high spots. Outside of that, normal watering will also help to level things out a bit.

I had a similar experience in my front yard. A neighbor came by the other day and said the grass looks like it’s been there for years … it’s been there more like 90 days or so.

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar