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Homeowner irrigation system questions

Homeowner irrigation system questions

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bwmaier – posted 06 May 2007 18:51

I would like to install an irriagtion system for my hybrid bermuda lawn. I have almost 8k square feet and I only want to water the grass (no shrubs or flower beds). My yard slopes up from the street to the house (I’d guess about 30 degrees). My meter is on the right side of the driveway (approx. 2k sq feet of lawn) and the remainder (6k) is on the left side of the driveway. I have been told that this will take two zones (one on each side). The two quotes I’ve received call for rotor type heads. One uses Hunter parts and the other uses Rain bird. Of these two, which parts are better? What would be the top few choices for manufacturer for a system? I live in Paulding County, GA (west of Atlanta). I would like a system where I can water once or twice a week for a total of 1″. Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

tommy – posted 06 May 2007 23:51

Any brand rotor will do the trick…..they all put the water down slow enough to wet the slope without run off. Both Hunter and Rain bird are good products, Hunter makes better pro stuff,(for stadiums), but for the heads that are used for homeowners, both companies offer very similar quality products.

TexanOne – posted 07 May 2007 03:55

The choice between the Rainbird or Hunter is matter of opinion, but in my humble opinion, Hunter is definitely the equipment of choice.

I would however like to give you a third option to think about:

I would recommend you consider an irrigation setup using Hunter Institutional Spray heads, along with the use of MP Rotator 3000 mini-rotators. There are several advantages of using this setup:

1: The Hunter Institutional sprays have a built-in pressure regulator in each head – preset and non-adjustable to 30 PSI. Pressure regulation at each head greatly boosts zone efficiency if using a nozzle like the MP Rotator.

2: The MP Rotator has matched precipitation rates for any angle of delivery, provided you use the same model nozzle across the entire zone (i.e. – all 3000’s, or all 2000’s). If using the Hunter Institutional heads, you will need MP Rotator 3000T’s (male threaded).

3: This irrigation setup will cost less than using large, gear-drive rotaries and will actually be more efficient. It is not uncommon for MP Rotators used on Hunter Institutional sprays to achieve efficiencies 80% to 85%, which is about the best you can hope for under any conditions with any equipment.

4: Irrigation system piping design will not be critical factor as in other systems by using this setup because of the pressure regulation features of the Hunter Institutional heads. Just make sure you don’t skimp on pipe size, and size the piping one size larger than you normally would. That way, you can insure each head has a minimum of 30 PSI at the head inlet.

In spacing the MP Rotators 3000’s, I recommend you do not exceed 80% of the radius throw for wind allowance – which is about 22’ (27’ x .80 = 21.6’, or about 22’). If any of the zones are next to a street and you want to avoid watering the street, use square spacing (22’ max between heads, and 22’ max between rows). If watering a street or pavement is not a factor, use triangle spacing (22’ max between heads, and 22’ x .866 between rows, or about 19’ between rows). Of the two layouts, triangle spacing is slightly more efficient, but avoiding overspray on the street or paved areas may force you into a square pattern layout.

The precipitation rate for the MP Rotator 3000 is a little less than ½” an hour. Unless your soil is compacted clay, you should not have any runoff issues at all.

No matter what layout pattern or equipment you choose, make sure the head and row spacing are all uniform and consistent during installation. The tedious little steps you take during installation add up in big water savings over the years of system use!

Here are the websites for the recommended equipment:

http://www.hunterindustries.com/Products/Sprays/isprayintro.html

http://www.mprotator.com/

FYI: I am licensed irrigation auditor, and the recommended equipment is the exact setup I use for all new and retrofit irrigation systems. I have used the Hunter Institutional / MP Rotator setup in my own home system for four years, and could not be more pleased with the results.

Let me know if you need any more information and I will be glad to help you out any way I can.

waterman – posted 26 November 2007 11:57

quote:Originally posted by bwmaier:I would like to install an irriagtion system for my hybrid bermuda lawn. I have almost 8k square feet and I only want to water the grass (no shrubs or flower beds). My yard slopes up from the street to the house (I’d guess about 30 degrees). My meter is on the right side of the driveway (approx. 2k sq feet of lawn) and the remainder (6k) is on the left side of the driveway. I have been told that this will take two zones (one on each side). The two quotes I’ve received call for rotor type heads. One uses Hunter parts and the other uses Rain bird. Of these two, which parts are better? What would be the top few choices for manufacturer for a system? I live in Paulding County, GA (west of Atlanta). I would like a system where I can water once or twice a week for a total of 1″. Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

with watering restrictions in your area will it be feasible cost wise and will you be able to water? One good thing about bermuda is its drought tolerance. Brown grass may not look good but with rainfall it comes to life.

seed – posted 28 November 2007 22:46

All good comments. But what is your water source? That may affect the size of the zones. Phil

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