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Author Topic:   Carpet Grass
Mike A
unregistered
posted 15 October 2001 19:29           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What is Carpet Grass and how do I get rid of it?

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wdrake
Turfmaster
posted 16 October 2001 04:28     Click Here to See the Profile for wdrake     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Carpetgrass is a warm season turfgrass that grows well in wet, poor draining soils. It looks a little like Centipedegrass. Grows best in acid soils (pH 5-6). Chemical eradication will depend on what the type of desirable turfgrass you have. If you want to try cultural practices to kill it off; cut back on irrigation and let it dry out and die.

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Mark M
unregistered
posted 12 March 2003 18:53           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike A:
What is Carpet Grass and how do I get rid of it?


Apply Arm and Hammer soap mixed to a paste to the area. This will kill only the carpet grass.

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jfrmgreer@aol.com
unregistered
posted 31 March 2003 13:04           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mark M:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Mike A:
[b]What is Carpet Grass and how do I get rid of it?


Apply Arm and Hammer soap mixed to a paste to the area. This will kill only the carpet grass.[/B][/QUOTE]

How do you apply the paste?

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M. Simmons
unregistered
posted 29 April 2003 09:43           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You stated that carpet grass can be killed with Arm & Hammer saop. Would this be Arm & Hammer laudry detergent? If not, what kind. Also, to mix it into a paste, do you use water? and how do you apply it. Any information you can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Merida Simmons

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TonyT
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posted 30 December 2003 12:11     Click Here to See the Profile for TonyT     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by M. Simmons:
You stated that carpet grass can be killed with Arm & Hammer saop. Would this be Arm & Hammer laudry detergent? If not, what kind. Also, to mix it into a paste, do you use water? and how do you apply it. Any information you can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Merida Simmons


Did you find out how to apply it???

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Dchall_San_Antonio
Turfmaster
posted 05 January 2004 13:25     Click Here to See the Profile for Dchall_San_Antonio     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Carpet grass is a common name for several grasses. Centepede and St Augustine are two I can think of off hand. Many people grow one or the other as their primary turf.

Do you have a weed problem?

[This message has been edited by Dchall_San_Antonio (edited 05 January 2004).]

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paschall@ewol.com
unregistered
posted 19 March 2004 15:06           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have Floritam and the carpet grass is smothering out the Floritam. I don't like the carpet grass. How do I get rid of it?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.


quote:
Originally posted by :
Carpetgrass is a warm season turfgrass that grows well in wet, poor draining soils. It looks a little like Centipedegrass. Grows best in acid soils (pH 5-6). Chemical eradication will depend on what the type of desirable turfgrass you have. If you want to try cultural practices to kill it off; cut back on irrigation and let it dry out and die.

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bob herbst
unregistered
posted 22 August 2004 11:49           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
you say to use a paste made up of Arm & Hammmer to kill carpet grass. What kind of Arm and Hammer and how do I make a paste and apply it to the grass. It is spreading wildly and I want to get rid of it

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miss sherry in FL
unregistered
posted 28 April 2005 13:05           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by david dahl:

Does anyone know how to kill carpet grass?? I read Arm and Hammer applied but how much, how often, and dry or in a paste???

Anyone care to help a new Floridian that hs no clue how to grow anything???

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rong
unregistered
posted 13 May 2005 14:54           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It is very simple to kill carpet grass. Use two scoopfuls of arm and hammer powder soap in a gallon of water. Pour it on the carpet grass and it will die within 48 hours.

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kmoody
unregistered
posted 16 May 2005 09:45           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rong:
It is very simple to kill carpet grass. Use two scoopfuls of arm and hammer powder soap in a gallon of water. Pour it on the carpet grass and it will die within 48 hours.

What time of year can you do this Summer, Fall - does it matter and can you replace it with St. Augustine after it dies?

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DrHocker
unregistered
posted 07 June 2005 08:13           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did the soap kill the carpet grass?

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flowersun
unregistered
posted 05 July 2005 07:04           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, I have been using boric acid and it works, but it is getting quite costly. So I'm going to go out today and buy the Arm & Hammer and try it out and I will post how it does.

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paulwml@comcast.net
unregistered
posted 26 July 2005 14:43           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by DrHocker:
Did the soap kill the carpet grass?


I sprinkled Arm & Hammer Fabricare w. Bleach on the fast growing "carpet grass" in my St Auqustine lawn. It turned brown within an hour or two and killed the patches of carpet grass plus much of the St. Augustine. I may have applied a little too much but there are still a few sprigs of St Augustine in the dead areas. I recommend rmoving the dead remains out with a garden tool so the good grass can grow back in.

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Lucky
unregistered
posted 27 July 2005 21:20           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've been running some test areas in my yard to see what is most effective on crabgrass in the Floritam. I have found that baking soda, sprinkled onto crabgrass that you have wet with the hose, will kill the crabgrass, and set back but not totally kill the St. Augustine. Seems the hotter and sunnier the better, and if its going to work, it works by the next day. I've tried Borax with no luck, salt water solution with no noticible results, and I just tried the Arm & Hammer laundry detergent liquid. I used three scoops per gallon of water and sprayed on the area. After 24 hours, slight yellowing of the crabgrass, so not nearly as effective as the baking soda. But perhaps in a few days....

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guest
unregistered
posted 05 August 2005 09:28           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lucky -

the borax works great for me. Within my experience borax is more productive than baking soda. I have a medium sized area where healthy floritam is fighting a turf war against crabgrasses. My applications of borax have caused minimal damage to the good grass whereas baking soda seems to harm both grass and weed.

I tried the baking soda but ...
The baking soda did show results within a day or two, but it also did quite a bit of damage to the floritam. I prefer the slow-poison borax that more precisely targets crabgrass.

Perhaps it is a problem of distribution? Have fou found a concentration or application method that causes the baking soda to more precisely traget just the crabgrass?

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Lucky
unregistered
posted 05 August 2005 16:05           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Guest,

I simply sprinkle the baking soda as finely as I can onto very wet grass. I agree that it damages the Floratam. My experiments with liquid Arm & Hammer detergent seem to show no damage to the crabgrass. I am treating fairly sizable patches in my lawn, however. I'd love the same information from you on how you are applying the borax. Do you just sprinkle it on? Does the grass need to be wet? Is it true that you can only treat with borax once on your lawn?

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guest
unregistered
posted 07 August 2005 15:18           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't know about the "only once". I guess it might depend upon how much you put out, how much rain you get, how well it drains, etc. etc.

I grab a handful of borax powder and scatter it out like it is fertilizer. It takes 4-5 days for yellowing to appear. After about 10 days, the carpetgrass root system is severely weakened and it is easy to rake it out. It will grow back, but much less healthy and at a much greater disadvantage versus floritam. With each treatment, the floritam gets thicker and stronger while the carpetgrass gets thinner and weaker.


For example - I have put it in same area three times this year at about 6-8 week intervals. With each treatment, the carpetgrass gets significantly thinned. On first pass, it was mostly carpet/crab with the floritam struggling to spread into the area. On the second treatment it was 50/50. On the last treatment it was mostly Floritam with pockets of carpet/crab.

My first experiment with borax was early last august from an entry on this blog. The landscaper was telling me that I would have to use round-up and re-sod ... anything was worth a try. The test area was 30/30/30 of floritam, carpetgrass, and beggarweed. Used a rake to "comb out" and pull the big clumps then followed with a box of borax per 500Sq ft. By October floritam was dominant. A winter of atrazine treatments killed off the beggar weed and the area is now virtually weed free.

The area mentioned first - with three treatments this year - got the same thing last year but it started with 80/10/10 carpet/ftam/beggar. The carpetgrass was so thouroughly established that it had a mat of roots rather than a central clump. My attempts at raking were more of a thinning out than a pulling up. When the growing season started, the carpetgrass came storming back. It was a waste of atrazine to try killing carpet/crab ... the borax does better in summer than atrazine in winter (haven't tried borax in winter).

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Guest
unregistered
posted 08 August 2005 21:12           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Quote from the following website:
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h519borax.html

"Borax contains boron which is an essential micronutrient that aids in sugar transportation in plants. Borax must be applied with great caution because boron remains immobile in the soil and can accumulate to form a "hot spot" in the lawn. Boron toxicity results in yellow and brown spots around edges of leaves. Stems wilt and eventually the weed dies. Established grass appears to withstand the minute excess of boron needed to kill creeping charlie, though it may show brown discoloration temporarily. If the borax solution is applied in too high a concentration, or repeatedly, it will then be toxic to grass and many other plants. This treatment can be applied only once each year for two years."

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Guest
unregistered
posted 08 August 2005 21:15           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Guest, More Questions....
1) What type of rake are you using?
2) How do you keep the crabgrass from reinfesting the "Thinned" areas?
3) when you broadcast the borax do you water it in?
4) Are you using 20 Mule Team Borax?

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guest
unregistered
posted 11 August 2005 10:07           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Guest, More Questions....
1) What type of rake are you using?

a regular garden rake. my floritam spreads along the ground and then grows striaght up. The carpetgrass grows from a central clump and then sreads out spreads out across the top. if you rake so that the forks don't catch the floritam the the cartpetgrass usually rakes back to the central clump.


2) How do you keep the crabgrass from reinfesting the "Thinned" areas?

I mow 6-8" tall.

3) when you broadcast the borax do you water it in?

Never gave it any thought. Sprinkler goes off twice a week during dry season and it rains every day at 3:30 otherwise.

4) Are you using 20 Mule Team Borax?
Yes. Straight from grocery store.


**
given above comment by guest, I think that the only reason I have been able to use borax 3 times is because the soil is sandy and we get so much rain. Perhaps the same amount of borax somewhere else would have poisoined the soil by now.

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thanatos
Friend
posted 17 July 2006 01:53     Click Here to See the Profile for thanatos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If Borox remans immobile in soil, then I assume the carpet grass that died in the application spot will not return.

If the borox is flushed away over time, then I assume the borox is not accumulating in that area and re-application is a must.

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thanatos
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posted 17 September 2006 03:04     Click Here to See the Profile for thanatos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, after two months, the zoysia I planted it taking off, but still not faster than the carpet grass.

Right now I have a front lawn that consists of Common Bermuda, El Toro Zoysia and Carpet Grass.

The carpetgrass is highly invasive & I gave up trying to get rid of it. It spred faster than the zoysia and easily dominates the bermuda.

I water and fertilize it. And guess what? It actually looks good. It's not as thick and beautiful zoysia, but it's more dense and better looking than bermuda. It just seems that Carpet Grass is going to easily take control of my entire front lawn & I guess I'll just keep watering and let it take over.

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Judith Mac
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posted 01 October 2006 13:39     Click Here to See the Profile for Judith Mac     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the info about ridding my floritan from carpet grass.... I used 2 1/2 scoops per gallon of water ,of dry ARM & HAMMER laundry detergent... I applied it with a watering can---after 2 hours the crab/carpet grass was dark brown..The floitan was peeking out of the dark patches and looks healthy to me ... Now I have to rake !!

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Oliver
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posted 03 October 2006 18:20     Click Here to See the Profile for Oliver     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Judith Mac:
Thanks for the info about ridding my floritan from carpet grass.... I used 2 1/2 scoops per gallon of water ,of dry ARM & HAMMER laundry detergent... I applied it with a watering can---after 2 hours the crab/carpet grass was dark brown..The floitan was peeking out of the dark patches and looks healthy to me ... Now I have to rake !!

You mention "scoops". Do you mean the "scoop" included in the Arm & Hammer box?

Thanks!

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Judith Mac
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posted 15 October 2006 16:47     Click Here to See the Profile for Judith Mac     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, I used the scoops that come in the Arm and Hammer detergent......... BUT now do I leave the dead carpetgrass as mucch in the floritan , or should I pull it out

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dawg-of-lawn
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posted 17 October 2006 08:27     Click Here to See the Profile for dawg-of-lawn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I tried the Arm and Hammer as directed(2.5 scoops per gallon). The Carpet grass turn a little unhealthy looking but is not dead. It has been over a day. This is what I did: I mixed the A&H and appliedit with a sprinkler can. Is there anything I did wrong? Thanks

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ElectricFlyGuy
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posted 06 October 2007 19:34     Click Here to See the Profile for ElectricFlyGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have researched this very problem with ridding crabgrass from Floritam and there is a liquid that can be sprayed in the areas that you fought off the crabgrass and it prevents the seeds from re-germinating in the spring. Crabgrass goes dormant in cold weather and drops its seeds for spring germination. I have heard about the baking soda trick from my agricultural dept. but, have been told that it can also damage the Floritam/ St. Augustine grasses. I will return later with the name of the liquid that you are to use to spray over the dormant crabgrass in >>>January<<< only. I will try the Borax. Crabgrass requires alot of water to thrive. Alot of water can drown out the Floritam. Too little water can damage Floratam also. So, it is a touch and go situation.The liquid that you spray on crabgrass in January, acts like 'PREEN' to crabgrass. Does not ever allow it to regrow/or the seeds to germinate in the same spot again. I am liking the tips I have been reading here! In the spring, I use Scotts w/atrazine in moderation and it makes my Floritam explode against the crabgrass. Also, Crabgrass does not like to be shaded,so, if you can get your Floritam to grow so thick, it will shade out and eliminate the crabgrass but it is tuff to do. I also want to cut my Floritam at 4 to 5 inches high because, crabgrass is usually a low but thick growing pest. Also try to contact your local agricultural dept.. They are there for you. Thanx, Scott

quote:
Originally posted by Lucky:
Guest,

I simply sprinkle the baking soda as finely as I can onto very wet grass. I agree that it damages the Floratam. My experiments with liquid Arm & Hammer detergent seem to show no damage to the crabgrass. I am treating fairly sizable patches in my lawn, however. I'd love the same information from you on how you are applying the borax. Do you just sprinkle it on? Does the grass need to be wet? Is it true that you can only treat with borax once on your lawn?


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pgharr
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posted 01 February 2008 06:41     Click Here to See the Profile for pgharr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
carpet grass easily killed off by wick wiping with glyphosate. In place of a wick wiper use a small brush.

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Hengag
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posted 11 February 2008 14:52     Click Here to See the Profile for Hengag     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can you explain "wick wiping with glyphosate".
Thank you


quote:
Originally posted by pgharr:
carpet grass easily killed off by wick wiping with glyphosate. In place of a wick wiper use a small brush.

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kamoteq
Friend
posted 26 September 2008 17:01     Click Here to See the Profile for kamoteq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
After some research of my own on how to get rid of carpetgrass in St. Augustine or Floratam here in Florida, I have come to use the best and safest way I know possible. I have read about some other means to kill it like borax, some use arm & hammer soap, etc. or chemicals. I do not want to use this since I have kids and they play a lot in my lawn.

The best I have tried is saltwater. Carpetgrass is known to have poor salt tolerance which is the opposite for St. Augustine or Floratam. I used the water discharge from my water softener by rerouting the small hose to a 7 gallon tub. If this is not possible, just use tap or rain water. Put about 2 cups of salt in the tub and make sure it's all dissolved. It may take 2 days to dissolve it. I used the salt from my water softener which is the Morton Salt brand (can be bought at Home Depot, Wal-Mart or Sams Club - but any brand will do). A 40lb bag is about $4.00. This is more than enough salt but depends on how much Carpetgrass you have. Since Carpetgrass have shallow roots, you don't have to use much saltwater in an area. I bought a 2 Gal. water can at Home Depot for $5.00 and used it to water the Carpetgrass every other day. Water in dry conditions only. In a about 2 or 3 days, you will notice the Carpetgrass turning brown without harming your lawn. Be very carefull on your mix. Do not put too much salt as this will kill both Carpetgrass and your lawn. Tasting the water may be necessary for best judgement. The water must taste like seawater or a little less saltier.

Once the Carpetgrass are all dried up and brown, use a shallow rake to remove them. You will need to be diligent in watering the carpetgrass for a few days. It took me just 1 week to kill about 100 sq/ft of carpetgrass.

There is no weed killer for Carpetgrass. My lawn is serviced by TrueGreen and they will only kill it using grass killer with my permission. I will then have to remove the dead grass myself and re-sod.

Here is a link to see what carpetgrass looks like.

http://www.american-lawns.com/grasses/carpet.html

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tommycod
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posted 16 July 2009 08:33     Click Here to See the Profile for tommycod     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Carpet is a legitame lesser quality grass; very sustaianable. in fact, if u have poor growing conditions and dont fertilize, then u will get carpet to come in and b most competetive. it survives low pH and lowfertility, so just growing a GOOD lawn will make it less comeptetive. MSMA and such will take it in bermuda zoysia. can try vantage in centipede, but carpet tolerates some. fertilizer and pH are the key to its removal.

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